Best laid plans …

For part of this winter I made plans to camp and photograph in the Big Sur area.  I had my campsite booked and was looking forward to 5 days of exploring the coast.  Then the rains came. The result was a considerable portion of Hwy 1 south of Big Sur was closed due to mudslides.  As it got close to my departure date it became clear that the highway was unlikely to re-open while I was there.  The campground, although accessible from a back route, would only allow access to a short section of the highway. So I cancelled my campsite reservation, booked a hotel in Moro Bay, and headed off to see whatever I could.

Although the section of Hwy 1 that I really wanted to see was closed, I still managed to see enough to make the trip worthwhile.  I was just disappointed that I didn’t get to see what I really wanted to see.  I guess that just means a return trip sometime.

Moonstone Beach

The evening of my arrival I enjoyed shooting sunset at Moonstone Beach.

Sunrise the next morning saw me photographing Morro Rock from the North.  The rock, a major landmark of Morro Bay, is the remains of an old cinder cone.

Morro Rock

Breakfast time!

Later in the day I visited Hearst Castle.  The history of the home of William R Hearst was quite interesting and the site was well worth a visit.

I spent the rest of the afternoon exploring the nearby coast.  Of interest were a number of beaches heavily populated with Elephant Seals.

Squirrel

Birds

Sunset

Sunset

An interesting shaped rock provided subject matter for my shoot the next morning.

Spooner’s Cove

I spent the rest of the day exploring the coast north of Morro Bay and, later in the day, Morro Bay State Park.

The next morning I returned to Morro Bay State Park to shoot Morro Rock again at sunrise, this time from the south.

Morro Rock

My next stop was to check out the town of Cayucos.  There was lots to see, including a huge pier, surfers, and an interesting main street.  Of course I had to check out one of the landmarks, the Brown Butter Cookie Company!  I’m happy to report the cookies were great!

Just down the road a bit was the tiny community of Harmony.  With a population of 18 it is comprised mainly of artist’s shops.

Harmony

Harmony

I finished off the day photographing Ragged Point, which is as far north as I could go.  Just past the Ragged Point Inn the road was closed.

Ragged Point

On my final morning I returned to Cayucos to capture the pier at sunrise.

Cayucos Pier at Sunrise

I leave you with this final image that just seems to need Humphrey Bogart to complete it.

Cayucos Pier

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A Winner

I’m pleased and honoured to share with you that my photo, Miner’s Lamp, won First Place in People Black and White, Best of Division in Black and White Photography, and Judge’s Award of Excellence at the recent Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival Photo Competition.

miners-lamp-with-ribbons

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Potpourri

Over the winter, here in the desert, I haven’t done a lot of “big” photo trips.  I still have had lots of opportunities to capture the beauty that surrounds us.  So here is a sampling of some of my favourite shots over the winter.

My backyard provides opportunities to practice photographing birds, such as this Verdin peeking at me from among the flowers.20161126-056a2703-edit

Then there was this Orange-crowned Warbler who was intent on checking out the Hummingbird feeder and swing.

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In early December I went camping overnight in Joshua Tree National Park.  An interesting rock and tree provided subject matter to shoot from different angles.  As well, sunset provided some nice colours in the sky.

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While practicing with a recently acquired 10-stop ND filter, I captured this shot of a waterfall on the golf course in our community.20161221-056a3669-edit

A few days later, several of us went down to the Salton Sea for a sunrise shoot.

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With a lot of rain in December, the pond at Barker Dam in Joshua Tree National Park filled up with water.  In late December I photographed the pond at sunset and then a bit later during “blue hour” after the sun had gone down.

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East of Julian, CA in San Diego County, a friend and I hiked into Cedar Creek Falls.  The 3-mile downhill hike in is fairly easy other than fording the creek 3 separate times.  The return, almost all uphill, is fairly strenuous.  However it was worth it for a view of the 80-foot high falls.

20170201-056a4771-editAnd there you have it … my potpourri of recent photos!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Julian – Pie and Beyond

In late November I went with members of my camera club to Julian, CA.  After a 2 hour drive through the Anza Borrego Desert and up a winding road into the mountains, we arrive in this picturesque town in San Diego County.

We spent a couple of hours in the morning just wandering around photographing anything that struck our fancy.

Click on a photo to open the gallery.

Following lunch we toured an old gold mine on the edge of town.  For 10 bucks it was actually a pretty good tour.  The added bonus was a lot of old “stuff” laying around the grounds.

Of course, the MAIN reason to visit Julian is to buy a pie.  With the downturn of the gold mining industry, growing apples gave the town new life.  Julian has become well know for its apple pies and we could not leave town without a visit to the Julian Pie Company. I know it will come as a surprise to those who know me, but I bought a pie to take home.

Julian Pie Company

Julian Pie Company

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Death Valley

My friends keep reminding me that I haven’t updated my blog in a while so here goes with one update at least.

Way back in November, my hearty group of photo buddies and I headed off for a 5-day trip to Death Valley.  On the way we stopped at Ibex Dunes for a sunset shoot.  We quickly learned the advantage of carrying a GPS with us, marking the location of the car before we set out to hike about a mile into the desert so we could find our way back in the dark.  When we hiked into the dunes it was daylight so everything was easy to see.  However, once it got dark it got really dark.  Without the GPS it would have been very easy to get disoriented trying to find our way back to the car.  Anyway, sunset at the dunes was beautiful.  (Click on a photo to enlarge.)

Ibex Dunes

Ibex Dunes

Ibex Dunes

Ibex Dunes

Ibex Dunes

Ibex Dunes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point

We checked into the hotel in Furnace Creek late in the evening.  Early next morning we were up and off to Zabriskie Point for a sunrise shoot. It was beautiful watching the sun light up the mountains in the distance before eventually lighting up the rock formations in front of us.  The number of photographers assembled for sunrise indicated just what an iconic location this is.

Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point

Super Moon setting at Zabriskie Point

Super Moon setting at Zabriskie Point

After breakfast we set off to check out Cottonball Basin as a possible sunrise location for the next day.  Unfortunately, after hiking quite some distance, the mud and salt formations that we had hoped to find just didn’t seem to be there.  Obviously conditions hadn’t been right for their formation.  Two of our group still felt they could make a decent sunrise shot at the location while another fellow and I just weren’t convinced.  We decided to return to Zabriskie Point the next morning instead.

Borax Wagons

Borax Wagons

On our way back to Furnace Creek for lunch we stopped at the remains of the Harmony Borax Works.  The short, self-guided tour was actually quite interesting, outlining the history of mining borate ore in the area.  The double-wagons with their twenty-mule teams that the Harmony plant made famous became the symbol of the Borax industry.

Harmony Borax Works

Harmony Borax Works

Badwater Basin

Badwater Basin

Our sunset shoot was at Badwater Basin.  We had to explore for quite a while before we found an ideal location where the dried, cracked mud and salt made nice formations.  In the end, the location we found was actually fairly good.

Badwater Basin

Badwater Basin

 

 
The next morning, two of us were back at Zabriskie Point for another sunrise.  As it turned out we made the right choice as our two friends were unimpressed with their sunrise shoot at Cottonball Basin.

Zabriskie Point Day 2

Zabriskie Point Day 2

Zabriskie Point Day 2

Zabriskie Point Day 2

For our sunset shoot we drove down to the Mesquite Flats Dunes.  The area of dunes is fairly large.  Unfortunately they were pretty much all covered in footprints.  We hiked quite a ways into the dunes and still couldn’t find any that weren’t covered. The other problem we encountered was that the light just went kind of flat towards sunset.  The contrast of light and dark between the two sides of a dune just never really happened.  The entire dune just gradually got darker.  Overall it was not the greatest sunset we had experienced.

But luck was on our side.  Overnight a windstorm blew through.  We decided to try the dunes again at sunrise.  We arrived early and hiked out into the dunes in the dark.  Overnight the footprints had been obliterated and we were left with pristine dunes.  Event better, the sun rose at such an angle to create the light and dark sides of the dunes that we wanted.  Overall, a great success!

Mesquite Flats Dunes

Mesquite Flats Dunes

Mesquite Flats Dunes

Mesquite Flats Dunes

View from Twenty-mule Team Canyon

View from Twenty-mule Team Canyon

For sunset we tried Twenty-mule Team Canyon.  Although sunset itself was kind of a bust, the changing colors of the rocks as the light changed was interesting.

Twenty-mule Team Canyon

Twenty-mule Team Canyon

Twenty-mule Team Canyon

Twenty-mule Team Canyon

For our final morning, all four of us were back at Zabriskie Point for sunrise.  Each morning we tried a slightly different vantage point. While sunrise was so-so, I thought that this morning’s location was the best of the three.

Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point Final Day

Following sunrise it was time for our return journey.  The five days had gone all too quickly.  Great company and great scenery is always an unbeatable combination.

 

 

 

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Salton Sea November ’16

20161109-_mg_5455-editThe other day, 3 friends and I set off early in the morning to photograph birds at the Salton Sea.  We arrived at the State Park just before sunrise so as to take advantage of golden hour.

While it was a beautiful morning I was a little disappointed in the number of birds we found.  Last year I went down about the same time (maybe a week or two earlier) and my recollection was that there were more birds last year.  This year there was a fair number of pelicans but I didn’t see any cormorants nor egrets.  Last year they were both plentiful.  It may just be timing and in a week or two the situation might be entirely different.

Anyway we had a fun morning capturing the birds and even a butterfly.

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Great News

20161008-056a0526Happy Canadian Thanksgiving to one and all!  Here, in our “northern” home we got our first snowfall of the season.  A cold day makes a perfect day to be inside finishing up a project that I have been working on.

Over the past couple of years, friends have told me that I should sell some of my prints.  I have been fortunate to have enough interest in some of my work that I have in fact sold the odd print.  

I have now partnered with Fine Art America to offer a selection of my photos online.

This company ships internationally and will custom make your order as you desire.  A variety of media are available, including framed prints, canvas gallery wraps, acrylic and metal prints.

To see the selection of prints that are currently available either go directly to Fine Art America or go to my Gallery Page.  From my Gallery Page simply click on any of the photos shown and you will be taken to the Fine Art America page for that photo.

I have started with a selection of some of my favourite photos.  I welcome any suggestions from readers as to other photos that should be added.

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Maligne Lake 2016

ml-blog-1The sun was just coming up as we arrived at the Maligne Lake boat launch.  The air may have been cool, just a few degrees above freezing, but our spirits were high as the lake was like glass.  As we unloaded our canoes and floated them in the cold clear water we remarked how different the morning was to the last time we were here a year ago.  That morning a light wind created lots of waves:  this morning the wind was dead calm.

Loading the canoe

Loading the canoe

Click on any image to enlarge.

With eight of us and four canoes, it took a little while to get everyone launched and loaded up.  For four of us, this was out second “annual” canoe trip together on Maligne Lake in Jasper National Park.  For the other four, it was their first experience with a canoe trip.  It would be 5 days before we returned to our starting point.

Paddling was relatively easy with no wind or waves.  There is something very special about the stillness of the lake with the only sound the rhythmic dipping of paddles punctuated by the occasional call of a loon.

We would go as far as Fisherman’s Bay campground, halfway down the 22 km lake, on the first day then on to Coronet Creek, at the far end of the lake, on the second.  After two nights at Coronet we would return to Fisherman’s Bay for a night then back home on the final day.

Maligne Lake

Maligne Lake

The first hour or so was very peaceful until the solitude was broken by the noise of a passing tour boat every 15 minutes or so.  The boats take an endless stream of sightseers to Spirit Island, just past Fisherman’s Bay.  A photo of Spirit Island once adorned the Canadian 5 dollar bill and has been called the most photographed place in Canada.  While the boat captains were very good about slowing down as they approached us, the boats still created enough wake that we had to be careful to turn into the waves to avoid capsizing.

Four Mile Point

Stopping at Four Mile Point

Halfway to Fisherman’s Bay we stopped and went ashore at Four Mile Point which is a picnic area.  It provided an opportunity to relax and rest arms that were not used to paddling.  After a stop of about a half hour we were once again on our way, arriving at the campsite about 3.5 hours after leaving the boat launch.

Four Mile Pt.

Looking south from Four Mile Pt.

ml-blog-8The day had turned sunny and warm as we pitched our tents and ate lunch.  We spent a relaxing afternoon just taking it easy, or, for those who fished (which was basically everyone but me), a chance to see what they could catch.  James (whose canoe I was sharing) caught the first Brook Trout, off the dock, which a short time later was fried up as an appetizer.

With 4 canoes we were able to pack plenty of firewood (there is none supplied at the campsites) and as the air cooled with the setting sun a blazing fire kept us warm.

Key to an enjoyable paddle on Maligne Lake is an early start, before the winds start to build.  Our second day was pretty much a carbon copy of the first.  Underway by about 9 am we were soon past Spirit Island and the tour boats.  Once in the southern half of the lake it was again tranquil as tour boats are not allowed in this part of Maligne Lake.

Paddler's view

Paddler’s view

Coffee time

Coffee time

Mid-morning James and I beached our canoe while James tried fishing from shore.  While there the others casually passed by with their fishing lines trailing behind.  With no luck on shore, we were soon back in the water for a slow “cruise” along the shore as James continued his quest for a large fish (OK, for any fish!).

Just before noon we arrived at the dock at Coronet Creek campground.  While three canoes were devoid of fish, sometime later Garry and his son Travis arrived toting their catch.  Appetizers all around again!

Tent

“The Big Top”

Once again the first order of business was pitching our tents and having lunch.  Following lunch, James and I paddled over to Mary Vaux Creek and hiked up the valley towards the glacier on Mount Mary Vaux.  The hike involved a lot of walking along a gravelly creek bed then some rock scrambling.  Had we the benefit of more time we might well have made it pretty much to the base of the glacier, however, late in the afternoon we had to turn back so we could paddle back to camp.  While we were gone, the rest of the group was out on the water fishing.  Stan and Sandi had the misfortune of getting caught by a wind gust and capsizing.  Fortunately they were close enough to shore that they managed to pull their canoe in, right it, empty it, and then retrieve all of their gear that had escaped.  When we got back to camp they were still warming themselves by the fire.

Hikes

Hikes

The next morning it was nice to be able to sleep in and have a relaxing breakfast without thinking about having to strike camp and load up the canoes.  The weather had turned a bit cooler and cloudy but still wasn’t too bad.  Following breakfast, James and I donned our day packs and set off up the Henry Macleod Trail.  The trail follows Coronet Creek up

Gray Jay

Gray Jay

to the moraine at the bottom of Coronet Glacier.  About 8 km up the trail is a primitive campground which is where we stopped for lunch.  Thanks to my handy dandy Jet Boil we were able to boil water and enjoy a hot coffee with our lunch.  After our lunch stop we continued about another kilometer or so, getting pretty much as close as we could to the alluvial fan without having to cross the creek.  It’s a pretty nice hike if you have the time to spare while at Coronet Creek campground.

Spruce Grouse Male

Spruce Grouse Male

Spruce Grouse Female

Spruce Grouse Female

The rain started late in the evening and carried on through the night, at some times fairly heavy.  By the time we got up in the morning it had pretty well quit but we still had to pack up a wet tent (actually only the fly) for the first time on the trip.  After a hearty breakfast we were once again on the water heading back to Fisherman’s Bay.  We had a few windy patches during the morning but for the most part it wasn’t bad at all.  Even better, the cloud and rain from the night before pretty much cleared out.  Along the way we stopped at Spindly Creek where James, Peter and Brenda spent some time fishing from shore while I wandered around with my camera.  Brenda did catch one large Brook Trout but alas it wiggled out of her hands and back into the water seconds before I was about to snap a photo.  Curses!

As we were about to leave, Garry and Travis showed up with 4 fish that they had caught.

Fish

Catch of the Day

Sadly, as we neared Spirit Island our solitude was once again disturbed by the noise of the tour boats.  However, we only needed to put up with them for a short time before we were once again at Fisherman’s Bay.  Another restful afternoon and a nice warm campfire in the evening capped off another great day.

Campfire

Campfire

Setting Sun Lights Up Peaks

Setting Sun Lights Up Peaks

As was, by now, our routine, on our final morning we were up early and on the water by about 9:00.  As we exited Fisherman’s Bay the wind came up a bit.  The major decision was which shore to follow.  Most often the western (left) shore is a little more sheltered.  This morning the wind seemed to be coming right down the middle of the lake and neither shore appeared to have an advantage.  In the end we opted for the eastern (right) shore which provided for a rest stop at Four Mile Point.  By the time we reached the point the wind was dropping to a slight breeze and the sky was clearing.  The rest of the morning’s paddle to Home Bay was uneventful.

All too soon we arrived back where we had started from and to the end of a pretty incredible 5-day journey.

Maligne Lake

Maligne Lake

 

 

 

 

 

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St. Louis

20160724-_MG_2951In the latter part of July we traveled to St. Louis for the Blue Goose Convention.  “What the heck is Blue Goose” you well may ask.  The Honorable Order of the Blue Goose, International is a fraternal organization made up of men and women working in the Property and Casualty business.  It started in 1906 based on the three principals of Charity, Character and Fellowship.  While it started as a bit of a spoof on clubs such as the Elks, it has survived and thrived for 110 years and has local chapters all across the US and Canada.  The annual gathering is a great time to socialize with members from across our two countries.

One of the highlights of the convention was a dinner/dance on the stage of the historic Fox Theatre.  Opened in 1929, it was the second largest theatre in the country at the time.  It was one of the first theatres to show “talkies” and boasted a huge, ball-shaped chandelier and a majestic Wurlitzer organ.  Fortunately it was saved from the wrecking ball after it closed in 1978 and was restored to its former glory.  It is an absolutely gorgeous theatre.

(As always, click on photos in my blog to see larger versions.)

20160722-_MG_2451-EditIt was very hot and humid while we were in St. Louis so I didn’t spend a lot of time wandering around the downtown area taking photos.  I did get up early one morning, hoping to get a nice sunrise shot at the Gateway Arch.  Unfortunately it was the one morning that was exceedingly cloudy and sunrise was a dud.  The clouds did make a bit of a dramatic backdrop for the arch though.

While we didn’t have a lot of time for sightseeing during the convention we stayed for a couple of days after the convention with good friends Jim and Carole.  We have known the two for over 20 years, visiting with them each summer at the convention.  They live just on the edge of St. Louis in a beautiful house surrounded by a gorgeous yard complete with a waterfall and resident mermaid.

Waterfall and mermaid

Waterfall and mermaid

20160724-_MG_2955On the afternoon after the convention ended, Jim and Carole took us to the Missouri History Museum which featured two main exhibits.  One was “Route 66, Main Street through St. Louis” and the other was “Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night”.  While the history of the little black dress from starting as a sign of mourning to becoming a popular style for cocktail or formal wear was interesting, the Route 66 exhibit, for me at least, was much more fascinating.

20160724-_MG_2985Following our visit to the museum and a drive through Forest Park, it was off to another St. Louis landmark – Ted Drewes Frozen Custard located on Route 66.  I remembered this tasty treat from our previous trip to St. Louis 15 years ago and managed to sample their wares twice during this week (the first time was when a busload of us descended on our way to see Mamma Mia at the outdoor Muny Theatre during the convention).  No visit to St. Louis can be complete without a taste of their famous frozen custard!

Our final day in St. Louis was just spent relaxing and visiting with our good friends.  Naturally I had to take the opportunity to poke around a bit with my camera! It was a perfect finale to a great trip!

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Skyline Trail – 2nd Half

Last August, a group of us attempted a 4-day backpacking trip on the Skyline Trail ( previous post ) in Jasper National Park.  Between huge blisters on my feet and snow when we woke up on the 3rd morning we had to abandon the second half of the trail.  In mid-July this summer a small group of us returned to complete the trail.

(As with all my posts, click on any photo to see a larger version).

Taking a break

Taking a break

Our plan was to hike up the Watchtower Trail to rejoin the Skyline Trail near the part where we had left off last summer.  With one vehicle parked at where we would ultimately exit our hike, and the other at the trail-head, we started our climb to the Watchtower Campground, some 10 km away.  The trail was mainly uphill and quite overgrown in areas.  We made our way through sections that had burned in a forest fire a little over a year ago.  While the green underbrush was starting to regenerate the obvious signs of the fire remained.

Signs of forest fire

Signs of forest fire

Signs of forest fire

Signs of forest fire

Watchtower Creek

Watchtower Creek

Bear Poles

Bear Poles (for safely hanging food bags) with The Watchtower mountain in background

While it was cloudy, it didn’t rain during the first day of hiking.  However, recent rains meant that for a lot of the day we were slogging along muddy trails and hopping on rocks across little streams.  For much of the day we followed Watchtower Creek with a crossing of the creek required at the end of the day to get to the campground.  Hordes of mosquitoes greeted us upon arrival.  The tent sites themselves were mounded making it very difficult to find a flat place to pitch your tent.  In any event we pitched our tents and enjoyed our respective freeze-dried dinners.  Just as we were finishing dinner, the rain started.  One of our group had earlier put up a tarp which made a great place to get out of the rain for a while.  Even though it was still early, during a break between showers we headed up to the tents and retired for the evening.  I had no problem falling asleep!

View back down the Watchtower Trail

View back down the Watchtower Trail

The rain continued through much of the night but quit early in the morning.  Even though the fly was still wet, we were able to pack up the tent and the rest of the gear without getting everything else wet.

The day started by continuing up the Watchtower Trail to where it joined the Skyline Trail.  This 3.4 km section included a pretty steep climb through shale skree which required some careful footing.  By mid-morning we were on the Skyline Trail, heading to Curator Lake where we stopped for lunch.  As we relaxed and had something to eat, we had a nice view of the lake and the trail up to The Notch.

Curator Lake

Curator Lake

Curator Lake

Curator Lake, The Notch pass is the snowy area at upper right

The sign says it all

The sign says it all

Even though the trail to The Notch was only 2 km it was fairly steep in parts which made for a challenging climb.  The last little bit was an uphill climb through a patch of snow.  At the top we were greeted with a cold wind and tiny hail pellets.  As soon as all of our group was at the top we headed off in hopes of getting out of the wind.  While the wind did decrease a bit the clouds rolled in and a light rain started.  With the start of the rain my camera got wrapped in plastic and buried in my pack to keep it dry, pretty much ending further photography.

Making final ascent to The Notch

Making final ascent to The Notch

Looking down on Curator Lake

Looking down on Curator Lake

View from The Notch over the Athabasca River Valley

View from The Notch over the Athabasca River Valley, Marmot Basin Ski Hill can be seen at extreme right

View from the ridge

View from the ridge

Our route took us along a ridge for several more kilometers before finally starting to descend towards Tekarra Campground.  As we got down to the valley floor we had a brief encounter with a grizzly.  I first saw the bear up ahead, crossing a stream.  It angled off away from us, disappearing behind a ridge.  By now we had our bear spray and bear bangers out and were watching for the bear to reappear.  After a minute or so it popped up on the ridge about a 30 or 40 meters from us.  I yelled and waived my hiking poles in the air and it turned and ambled away from us.  We continued to watch the bear for several minutes to make sure it didn’t circle back, then continued our hike.

The light rain let up shortly before arriving at Tekarra Campground in late afternoon.  Our total distance for the day was about 16 km.  The campground itself was pretty much a mud bog.  Our tent site looked like it had been partially washed away in spring runoff.  What was left was sloped so again the tent had to be positioned so that our heads would be uphill.  Some of the other tent sites were in slightly better condition but still mounded rather than flat.

I have to interject at this point that Parks Canada should be totally embarrassed by both campgrounds we stayed in on this hike.  They were poorly maintained and the tent pads were atrocious.  Hikers from all over the world pay for the “priviledge” of staying at these campgrounds.  Yes, they are back country camping and one shouldn’t expect first class facilities.  However, when you are paying for the site it would be nice to at least have a decent tent pad.  In the overall scheme of things, the cost to build flat pads surrounded by 4X4’s for the 6 or 8 sites at each campground would be minimal and would be greatly appreciated by the backpackers who are paying good money for them.

Once again, the mosquitoes at Tekarra drove us into our tents early.  The rain started a short time later and again continued through the night.  While it let up briefly in the wee hours of the morning, we packed up in the morning in light rain.  With this being our final day it wasn’t as big an issue as we wouldn’t be having to set up wet gear later in the day.

Our hike took us another 5 km along the Skyline Trail, much of it uphill, before starting a 9 km descent down the Signal Mountain Fire Road.  With a 45 pound pack on your back, 9 km of steady downhill is pretty tough on the knees and feet.  I was pretty happy to reach the parking lot at the end of the trail by shortly after noon.

Even though cloud and rain on our hike had obscured some of the great scenery, it was still a pretty enjoyable 3 days (although I certainly wouldn’t have complained about sunny skies!).

 

 

 

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